WORKSHOPS - OVERVIEW

 

 

Monday, September 14

15:30 - 17:15              Workshop - Zoonotic infections from fish and shellfish

(hall Nadir)

Organisers: O. Haenen, J. Evans and M. Longshaw

 

 

Tuesday, September 15

09:00 - 10:45              Workshop - Shellfish disease diagnosis

(hall Taurus)

Organisers: I. Arzul and F. Berthe

 

15:30 - 17:15              Workshop - Myxozoa

(hall Taurus)

Organiser: J. Bartholomew

 

 

Wednesday, September 16

09:00 - 10:45              Workshop - Gill health

(hall Taurus)

Organiser: M Powell

 

 

Thursday, September 17

15:30 - 17:15              Workshop - Aquatic animal diseases surveillance

(hall Taurus)

Organisers: A. B. B. Jensen and K. Morgan

 

 

Saturday, September 19

10:00 - 17:00              Histopathology Workshop - Gastrointestinal pathology                     

Organiser: D. Bruno

(only registered EAFP Members)

 

 

 

 

 


WORKSHOPS IN DETAIL

 

 

Monday, September 14

 

15:30 - 17:15              Workshop - Zoonotic infections from fish and shellfish (hall Nadir)

O. Haenen, J. Evans and M. Longshaw

 

The worldwide development of aquaculture and the worldwide transport of live aquaculture products has, apart from many advantages, also worrisome consequences. Among them is the occurrence and increased recognition of zoonotic disease agents causing epidemics and carrier states in cultured fish and shellfish and their transmission to humans resulting in mild to severe disease. Diagnosis of zoonotic infections in humans by clinicians is often hampered by a poor knowledge of zoonotic disease agents derived from aquatic species and associated clinical signs.

The zoonotic infections can be divided into:

- topically acquired (contact) zoonosis: risk groups: aquaculture professionals, fish culturists/processors/handlers & consumers

- food borne (ingestion) zoonosis: risk group: consumers

 

We organize this workshop based on the increasing cases of zoonotic agent detection that have resulted in both aquaculture and human diseases.. In this workshop we strive to present an overview of the prevalence and incidence of zoonotic infections and discuss the best management practices, including preventive measures,  for aquaculture professionals, fish processors, and the consumers. Our focus is on principal zoonotic pathogens: Vibrio vulnificus, Streptococcus iniae, S. agalactiae, Edwardsiella tarda, Mycobacterium spp. and noroviruses (Norwalk-like viruses).

The workshop will be opened with 3 lectures from the organizers:

 

Evans: Overview of zoonotic infections in fish and shellfish

Haenen: Emerging problems with zoonotic bacteria in intensive warm water fish culture

Longshaw: Parasitic diseases acquired from fish

 

We invite you to participate in this workshop. You may present a small lecture (maximum of 4 Power Point slides ) on an aspect of the  zoonotic subject in 8 minutes + 2 minutes discussion. Please inform O. Haenen if you wish to present a lecture. We are interested in the following subjects: 

 

Case reports, country reports of topically acquired and food borne zoonotic infections in humans arising from fish or shellfish

Detection methods for zoonotic agents

Therapy of zoonotic infections

Prevention of zoonotic infections 

 

A general discussion will be held, and a report of the workshop will be made and published in the Bulletin of the EAFP.

 

 

Tuesday, September 15

 

09:00 – 10:45  Workshop - Shellfish disease diagnosis

(hall Taurus)

Organisers: I. Arzul and F. Berthe

 

Diagnostic approach in mollusc disease surveillance: Where are we?

Surveillance of mollusc diseases is routinely performed by histology or cytology and increasingly by PCR. When outbreaks of mortality occur, histology is indicated as a frontline method if no specific pathogen is suspected and no presumptive diagnostic methods can be used. When a pathogen is detected and identified in light microscopy, confirmatory methods (e.g. electron microscopy and/or molecular probes) are usually used to overcome the lack of specificity of histology. However, there is no or very little consensus on how to best apply these different techniques. The lack of contextual methodological framework certainly hampers the efficacy and adequacy of investigation of and early response to disease outbreaks.

 

The efforts in research and development of DNA based diagnostic methods currently offer a broad panel of probes and tests. These offer the theoretical advantages of high sensitivity and high specificity, and possible rapid screening of molluscs for the presence of a targeted pathogen. However, while they are moving from development in research laboratories to routine application in disease monitoring programmes, validation and standardisation of these test are still needed. Combination of diagnostic methods and selection of tests urgently calls for the establishment of sensitivity and specificity values.

 

The further development and use of molecular diagnostic techniques such as real time PCR, microarrays, branched DNA based technology, also hold promise for international efforts to control the introduction of exotic diseases and pests into new geographic areas. One long recognised caveat to the routine use of molecular diagnostic techniques is false positive or false negative results. With the forecast application of new detection technologies to mollusc health, one should consider their possible advantages and disadvantages in light of the lessons learnt from PCR in the recent past.

 

Incidental detection of pathogen occurrence outside their known geographical range (e.g. Bonamia exitiosa in Europe) also raises concerns about our expectations for targeted surveillance. Histology, at best, would only provide a genus level type of information. Histology based surveillance indeed has several underlying assumptions which may need to be spelled out more clearly. How specific should be surveillance directly influence the selection and choice of analytical methods. The bottom-line of this question is that objectives of surveillance need to be clearly established.

 

In this context, the objectives of the proposed workshop will be to: 

Exchange practical laboratory experience in applying different methods and tests for mollusc disease diagnostic;

Discuss the choice of methods and tests according to possible objectives of surveillance; 

Review and forecast possible application of new detection methodologies to mollusc diseases and make some recommendations for their future use;

Propose a contextual methodological framework for investigation of disease outbreaks

 

 

 

Tuesday, September 15

 

15:30 – 17:15 Workshop - Myxozoa

(hall Taurus)

Organiser: J. Bartholomew

 

Myxozoan Special Session: Research approaches to studying climate change effects on myxozoan disease

While predictions for the effects of climate change on myxozoan disease will be similar to those developed for other fish pathogens, their complex life cycles introduce some unique considerations. The goals of this session are to begin discussion on current research approaches that can be applied to studying and making predictions of changing myxozoan disease patterns and to develop collaborative links and pre-proposal outlines for specific funding opportunities.

 

Some of the specific topics that will be considered include:

What we still need to know to predict how temperature changes will affect myxozoan disease (e.g. effects of temperature on host immune response, progress of infection in both hosts, effects of temperature on parasite stages in the environment).

What myxozoans would be appropriate models for study (e.g. those that have sufficient data and geographic distributions on the edges of the parasite’s current temperature range).

What methodologies should be developed or applied for monitoring disease or detecting changes in parasite abundance (e.g. water filtration/QPCR, sentinel studies etc) and what are the limitations of these in developing predictions

How do we integrate the various databases that predict changes in temperature, water flow, sedimentation etc to develop a model for disease effects.

 

 

 

Wednesday, September 16

 

09:00 - 10:45  Workshop - Gill health

(hall Taurus)

Organiser: M Powell

 

The issue of gill diseases and more importantly gill health is a significant focus with regard to fish health.  Both infectious and non-infectious gill diseases occur in both fresh and marine environments and represent significant losses to aquaculture.  This workshop is being held as an initiative of the European Gill Health Network and will focus on what is currently known about the patho-physiology, treatment, immunology and impact of gill diseases in aquaculture.  Whereas much of the research appears to have been concentrated upon identification of aetiological agents it is envisaged that this workshop will lead to identification of common gaps in our knowledge allowing us to be able to identify key areas of urgent research.  This workshop will consist of several short presentations from experts in their respective fields and an active discussion and commentary session.  The outcome of this workshop will allow us to identify strategic areas where a more focussed research effort is required if we are to combat the impact of gill disease.

  

Tentative outline (issues for discussion)

Introduction

Patho-physiology of gill diseases/disorders

Pathogenesis of gill diseases

Diagnosis and case definitions

Immunology in gill diseases

Treating gill diseases what works and what doesn’t

Commercial experiences with gill health management

Discussion

Conclusions

what are the gaps in our knowledge and understanding

what developments are needed for improvement of gill health?

 

 

 

Thursday, September 17

 

15:30 - 17:15  Workshop - Aquatic animal diseases surveillance

(hall Taurus)

Organisers: A. B. B. Jensen and K. Morgan

 

 (In association with The International Society of Aquatic Animal Epidemiology (ISAAE))

 http://isaaepi.org/modules/news/

 

Background

Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector in the world. Epidemics of established and emerging diseases represent a threat to the biodiversity of indigenous fisheries, the sustainability of developing aquaculture and to the social fabric of the populations associated with them.

Aquatic disease surveillance should be an important component of national and international disease control programs. The practical issues of How? Who? Where and at what cost? are less well defined, even in terrestrial animal health where the epidemiological capacity and practical experience of international disease control is better established. The OIE is currently preparing a guidebook on Aquatic Animal Disease surveillance, and this workshop will be based on this guidebook.

 

Aims

The aim of the workshop will be to examine some of the practical issues surrounding aquatic animal disease surveillance and to discuss the OIE guide on Aquatic Animal Disease surveillance and its applicability on a national and international level.

 

Format and content

The workshop will open with a short presentation of the OIE guide and discussion of the major topics to be addressed. Members of the ISAAE will present a few surveillance programmes from their experience, and point out the flaws and advantages of these. Then we invite participants to discuss these topics, based on any problems, solutions or ”quandries” from personal experience.  We encourage people from all fields within aquatic animal diseases (diagnostics, immunology/vaccinology, epidemiology, risk assessment, sampling) to share their opinions in relation to their field of expertise.

One of the exciting things about aquatic surveillance is that there is no ideal system. This workshop presents the opportunity to consider surveillance systems which capture relevant information but can be tailored to individual needs, when considering specific diseases or areas for surveillance.

 

Faciliators

The facilitators will be members of ISAAE, some have been involved in the development of guidelines and the practical execution of national and international disease surveillance programmes, others have expertise and experience in workshop and small group facilitation. For further details contact Britt Bang Jensen email: abrj@vet.dtu.dkThis e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

 

Saturday, September 19

10:00 – 17:00 Histopathology Workshop - Gastrointestinal pathology                     

Organiser: D. Bruno

(only registered EAFP Members)

 

The histopathology workshop on 'gastrointestinal pathology' will be take place on the 19 September.  This workshop is for EAFP membes only and priority given to individuals who can present material on this subject.

If you would like to reserve a place please contact David Bruno ( d.bruno@marlab.ac.ukThis e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it ).  There will be a small charge of 25 euros to cover the cost lunch and the production of a CD.